Umicore Building Products Donates VMZinc Roof for AIA NC’s New Headquarters

Modern, “Green” Architecture & Design Center to be crowned by

Rendering, AIA NC Center for Architecture & Design

PIGMENTO Red architectural zinc.

September 22, 2011 (Raleigh, NC) – Umicore Building Products USA (UBP), headquartered in Raleigh, NC, has donated $70,000 worth of PIGMENTO® Red VMZ standing-seam zinc panels to be used for the roof of the American Institute of Architects North Carolina Chapter’s new, modern, sustainable headquarters building that is now under construction in downtown Raleigh.

“We are proud to be a supporting member of the AIA NC building. It is wonderful to be a part of such an important project in our own backyard,” said Daniel Nicely, an associate member of the AIA and UBP’s Director of Market Development.

Officially named the AIA NC Center for Architecture and Design, the building was designed by Frank Harmon Architect PA of Raleigh, a multi-award-winning firm well known for its modern, green, regionally appropriate design. Under the direction of principal Frank Harmon, FAIA, the firm won a professional design competition for the project.

The design competition required submissions to be as “green,” or environmentally sustainable, as possible. Among the building’s many eco-friendly features will be the zinc roof.

“The three main environmentally sustainable qualities of architectural zinc are its  durability, its recyclability, and the moderate amount of energy required to manufacture it,” said Nicely. “Using architectural zinc for roofing materials or exterior cladding helps architects achieve LEED points.”

The new building’s other green features include: careful siting, extensive use of glass, operable windows, and open porches to maximize natural lighting and ventilation; a geothermal heating and cooling system; an underground rainwater collection cistern, the use of locally available and recycled materials wherever possible; a broad roof overhang to protect the interior from harsh summer sun; a special energy-conserving elevator; and an innovative parking “garden” comprised of porous paving that will eliminate all storm water run-off.

“There were three irreplaceable elements in the design of the AIA NC Center for Architecture and Design: stone walls, landscape, and the metal roof,” said Frank Harmon. “Of these, the zinc roof was the most generous donation, and I think it will shelter the AIA for generations.”

The red pigment in the PIGMENTO® Red panel is created through a factory process that adds the red pigment to the coil during the manufacturing of the sheets and coils. The advantage of adding the pigment during manufacturing is that the panel will not require any reapplication of color, and the color will weather evenly and smoothly as it ages. VMZINC is recognized for blending well and easily with other architectural products, such as the AIA NC Center’s wood siding (cypress), stonework, concrete, steel, and glass.

The AIA NC building and landscape were designed as one interlocking system with the majority of the site left as green, open, park-like space in this urban setting. The building should be complete by the end of November. The landscaping will not be complete until the spring of 2012. For more information on the AIA NC Center for Architecture and Design, visit www.frankharmon.com and click on “current projects.”

For more information on UBP and VMZ PIGMENTO® Red products, visit www.vmzinc-us.com.

About Umicore Building Products USA, Inc.

Umicore is a world-leading producer of architectural zinc. For over 160 years, Umicore has been providing innovative solutions for building owners, architects and contractors. Umicore has offices and representatives all over the world. In the United States, Umicore Building Products USA, Inc., is based in Raleigh, NC. For additional information, visit www.vmzinc-us.com.

Frank Harmon Wins High Award for Simple Project

The JC Raulston Arboretum Lath House at NC State University wins AIA NC Honor Award 

September 15, 2011 (Raleigh, NC) – Frank Harmon Architect PA has received a 2011 Honor Award from the North Carolina Chapter of the American Institute of Architects (AIA NC) for the firm’s design of North Carolina State University’s JC Raulston Arboretum Lath House in Raleigh.

The Lath House received one of only two Honor Awards presented this year, and it was a pro bono project for Harmon’s firm as a gift to the Arboretum.

The Lath House is an open-air laboratory for horticultural research. Its screen of wood two-by-twos fulfills the specific light-to-shade ratio young plants need before they transition into the larger gardens.

According to the firm’s principal, Frank Harmon, FAIA, the structure was designed as an abstract of a tree that spreads its branches to protect the plants.

The Lath House replaced an older structure that sheltered approximately 700 young and tender plants that perform best in shade. The new structure may provide space for 1000 new plantings.

The 10 and a half-acre JC Raulston Arboretum is a nationally acclaimed garden with one of the largest and most diverse collections of plants, shrubs and trees adapted for use in Southeastern landscapes from over 50 different countries. Plants are collected and evaluated in an effort to find superior plants for use in southern gardens. The Lath House is a key element in the arboretum’s work.

“Over the last three decades, the JC Raulston Lath House has nurtured some of the most successful plants for use in Southern gardens, including hostas, ferns, hydrangea and rhododendron,” Harmon said. “We were honored to be a part of the Arboretum’s mission by designing the new Lath House.”

Will Lambeth, a former member of Harmon’s design team who left to attend Harvard University, served on the design team for the Lath House, which received a Merit Award this summer from the Triangle section of AIA NC and has been published at ArchDaily.com.

Harmon’s firm is known for designing projects that celebrate plant life, such as the cluster of buildings for the NC Botanical Gardens Visitors Education Center at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the Walnut Creek Wetlands Education Center in Raleigh, and the NC Museum of Natural Science’s open-air classroom at the Prairie Ridge Eco-station, also in Raleigh.  For more information visit www.frankharmon.com.

About Frank Harmon Architect PA:

Frank Harmon Architect PA is an award-winning architectural firm located in Raleigh, NC, and recognized nationally as a leader in modern, innovative, sustainable and regionally appropriate design. For the third consecutive year, the firm is ranked as one of the Top 50 Firms in the nation by Architect magazine, and Frank Harmon, FAIA, founder and principal, was included in Residential Architect’s recent “RA 50: The short list of architects we love.” The firm’s work has been featured in numerous books, magazines, journals and online magazines on architecture, including ArchDaily.com, Dwell, Architectural Record, Architect, and Residential Architect. For more information, go to www.frankharmon.com.

When No One Could Travel Faster Than A Horse

By Frank Harmon, FAIA 

Sketch by Frank Harmon, FAIA

 

August 2011

I bumped into a friend recently at a coffee shop who asked, “Did you recognize me waving at you from my car” last week? I had to admit I didn’t recognize her or her car. But thinking about it later, I remembered a remark by the social critic Lewis Mumford, who suggested that it’s hard to have a conversation with someone when you’re traveling more than three miles an hour.

I had a similar thought last summer when I was looking out the window of a friend’s house in Provence in the South of France. In the distance, two ancient villages clung to the hillside a few kilometers apart, connected by a modern road where tiny cars flitted by like brightly colored bugs. Once the ” province” of Rome, Provence is now a high tech center of European research and development centered in the vicinity of Aix en Provence. The landscape I saw from the window — olive trees, wheat fields, and vineyards surrounding villages built of stone and tile —  has changed very little since the time of the ancient Romans. Yet the old farms and vineyards are giving way to vacation homes and superstores. Some of the farmers have converted their farms into equestrian centers, where the sons and daughters of European scientists can ride horses on weekends. I saw a horse and rider that afternoon, slowly cantering along a trail between the two villages. Both seemed perfectly at ease in the landscape.

Why did the gait of the horse and rider seem so natural in the landscape while the speeding cars did not? I was startled by the contrast. The Provencal landscape was originally scaled to the speed of a horse. For over two thousand years, people could travel no faster than a horse could gallop. Distances between villages were based on what a horse or a human could walk in an hour or two. Fields were sized according to what a horse and plow could cover in a day. That is why the young woman riding the horse in the distance fit so comfortably in the landscape, whereas the red and blue cars zipping along the road seemed independent of this particular, ancient landscape.

We can find similar, slower landscapes in this country. One of the most beautiful roads in America, for example, is the Blue Ridge Parkway, which winds through the Appalachian Mountains. The speed limit on the parkway is 45 mph. Drive faster and you miss the views (and risk a speeding ticket) because the designers of the parkway shaped the road for a slower pace.

And In rural parts of North Carolina where roads are small, it’s possible to see the face of a farmer coming towards you in his truck because you are both driving slowly. As often as not he will wave. (Imagine doing that on an interstate highway or a six-lane suburban throughway.) In the two hundred or so years before automobiles came to North Carolina, our counties were sized based on the distance a farmer could travel on horseback in a day to pay his taxes at the county courthouse or sell his crops at market.

Throughout North Carolina, you also can find remnants of pre-automobile culture: country stores, now usually shuttered, spaced every few miles within walking distance of farmsteads; and country churches like Olive Chapel and Mount Pisgah Church, where steeple bells rang at a quarter to eleven on Sunday morning to remind folks they had 15 minutes to walk to service. High-speed roads have liberated these older landscapes. People no longer walk to the store or to church. And on the whole, this is better. But as my friend Jim Schlosser, who writes about architecture for the Greensboro Daily News, observed, architecture began to go downhill with the construction of the Interstate highway system. Since people no longer slowed down to drive through cities, architects designed buildings to be viewed at 65 miles per hour, with a consequent loss of scale, texture, and detail.

So as we cruise along our wide highways, it’s good to remember that, as a civilization, we have been walking and riding horses far longer than we have been riding in cars. Perhaps some of our discomfort with modern settlements is due to the fact they are sized for the speed of cars and not for the pace of humans. And certainly it’s hard to recognize a friend passing by in her car.

The Bridge at Concord

By Frank Harmon, FAIA

At museums and visitors centers, less interpretation is more.

One day in the 1970s, I wandered into the rare documents room at the British

North Bridge at Concord, sketch by Frank Harmon.

Museum, where cloth-shrouded glass cases held poems, speeches and letters written by famous people. You could pull back a cloth, read the document, and cover it up again. When I pulled back one of the cloths, I caught my breath: Before me was the Magna Carta. How amazing, I thought, to find the most important document in British history displayed so diffidently, in a glass case with a curtain over it. I was thrilled.

In America, we handle our history differently. The Declaration of Independence, for example, is encased in bulletproof glass in a gold-plated, titanium frame filled with argon gas. The case is lowered each night into a crypt beneath the National. Archive. The display is so overpowering that it is possible to feel that the container is more important than the founding document inside. It makes me feel as if I am being told of its importance rather than invited to discover it. Yet history is best discovered by each of us, just as democracy is best preserved as a personal responsibility.

I had another epiphany recently when I visited the North Bridge at Concord, Massachusetts, where the first battle of the American War of Independence took place. Now preserved as part of the Minute Man National Historical Park, the Bridge at Concord is a simple wooden structure spanning a stream about fifty feet wide. At each end of the bridge stand two stone monuments, one erected by the Americans, one by the British, many years after the battle. There is no visitors center nearby, no auditorium with a twenty-minute film, no interactive video recreating the battle, and certainly no titanium cases containing artifacts in argon. Instead, in a clearing next to the bridge, visitors sit in a small semicircle of wooden benches. A park ranger stands and tells how the British army, marching out from Boston to intimidate the colonists, approached the bridge and was met by a volunteer group of Minutemen.

The effect of his story is compelling. We can see the short distance between the two groups of men, who, muskets drawn, faced death that morning. We can imagine how the roar of guns silenced birds’ songs on that spring day. We can see the road where the American farmers approached the bridge, and we can see the road down which the British fled. The ranger quotes a poem written by Ralph Waldo Emerson for the dedication of the American monument on July 4,1837:

On the rude bridge that arched the flood,

Their flag to April’s breeze unfurled,

Here once the embattled farmers stood

And fired the shot heard round the world.

There at the North Bridge, nothing stands between our history and us except sunlight reflected in the dust. We are enlightened without being pushed, always a welcome experience.

Sometimes the best thing for a designer to do is to not get in the way.

 

About the author:

Frank Harmon, FAIA, is an award-winning architect. He is the founding principal of Frank Harmon Architect PA and a Professor in Practice at the NC State University College of Design. He writes frequently on the subject of architecture and his observations of architectural and historic places during his travels. For more information visit www.frankharmon.com.

 

Frank Harmon Architect PA Project Designer Accepted at Harvard

Will Lambeth will enter Harvard University’s Graduate School

Will Lambeth

of Design.

May 11, 2011 (Raleigh, NC) – Frank Harmon Architect PA is pleased to announce that project designer Will Lambeth has been accepted into the graduate program in Architecture at Harvard University’s Graduate School of Design.

For the past four years, Lambeth has worked in Frank Harmon’s award-winning firm on a variety of significant projects, including the North Carolina Museum of Natural Science’s Prairie Ridge Eco-station in Raleigh, the North Carolina chapter of the American Institute of Architect’s new Center for Architecture & Design in downtown Raleigh, and the Children’s Learning Center at the North Carolina Zoological Garden in Asheboro, NC. His most recent project, the Lath House at the JC Raulston Arboretum, NC State University, won a merit award from the Triangle section of the AIA in April 2011 and was published in ArchDaily.com, an international online architecture magazine.

A Greensboro, NC native, Will Lambeth joined Frank Harmon Architect PA as an intern architect in May 2009 after working part-time for the firm for two years. He was the 2009 valedictorian graduate of the NC State College of Design, Bachelor of Architecture program, where he received the Faculty Award for design excellence. He studied at the Prague Institute in 2007.

Lambeth’s areas of expertise include digital and physical modeling, graphic design, schematic design, and site analysis.

“I’ve learned so much about life and architecture working at FHA,” Lambeth said. “The firm has been like a family to me.”

“We are very proud of Will and wish him great success at Harvard,” said Frank Harmon, FAIA. “We look forward to seeing his future work.”

For more information on Frank Harmon Architect PA, visit www.frankharmon.com.

About Frank Harmon Architect PA:

Frank Harmon Architect PA is an award-winning architectural firm located in Raleigh, NC, and recognized nationally as a leader in modern, innovative, sustainable and regionally appropriate design. For the third consecutive year, the firm is ranked as one of the Top 50 Firms in the nation by Architect magazine, and Frank Harmon, FAIA, founder and principal, was included in Residential Architect’s recent “RA 50: The short list of architects we love.” The firm’s work has been featured in numerous books, magazines, journals and online magazines on architecture, including ArchDaily.com, Dwell, Architectural Record, Architect, and Residential Architect. For more information, go to www.frankharmon.com.

Frank Harmon Architect PA Welcomes New Team Member

Project manager Tika Hicks joins the award-winning firm.

Project manager/designer Tika Hicks joins Harmon's award-winning team.

March 15, 2011 (Raleigh, NC) – Frank Harmon Architect PA of Raleigh, NC, has announced that project manager/designer Tika Hicks of Raleigh has joined the firm’s award-winning team.

Hicks brings 12 years of experience in architectural project management, design and production services to the firm, which includes educational/institutional, commercial and residential projects, as well as historic preservation. Among other notable projects, she was instrumental in the restoration of the modernist Henry Kamphoefner residence and in its subsequent renovation/addition in conjunction with the late North Carolina State University’s College of Design Professor Robert Burns, FAIA.

Born in Chicago, Hicks grew up in Ithaca, New York, and moved to Raleigh in 1989. She attended Pennsylvania State University, where she concentrated in architecture, design and sculpture. She then studied abroad in Florence, Italy, before entering the N.C. State University College of Design, where she received her Bachelor of Arts degree in Environmental Design in Architecture.

Hicks’ previous work experience includes stints with Raleigh firms Kurt Eichenberger, AIA, Richard Hall Associates, Clearscapes, and Cannon Architects, and with the Chapel Hill firm Lucy Carol Davis Architects.

Harmon’s firm’s reputation for innovative, sustainable and regionally appropriate design led Hicks to his office.

“I want to be part of a great team that creates excellent and exciting projects that contribute to the sustainability of the built environment,” she said recently. “A huge part of why I’m here is because I want to work on projects that change and improve the built environment. Frank was ‘green’ before ‘green’ was ‘green.’ I couldn’t be happier to be a part of his team.”

Hicks has already been assigned to work on several of Harmon’s projects that are in design development or construction, including the Shellfish Research Hatchery at UNC-Wilmington, the site plan and new facilities for the Audubon Sanctuary on Pine Island, NC, the United Therapeutics Field House in Durham, and Riverworks in Jacksonville where a former wastewater treatment plant is being converted into an Environmental and Education Center.

For more information on Frank Harmon Architect PA, visit www.frankharmon.com.

 

About Frank Harmon Architect PA:

 

Frank Harmon, FAIA, principal of Frank Harmon Architect PA in Raleigh, NC, is also a Professor in Practice at NC State University and a frequent speaker at AIA and other design conventions and conferences throughout the US and Canada. In 2010, his firm was ranked 13th out of the top 50 firms in the nation by Architect magazine and Harmon was included in Residential Architect’s recent “RA 50: The short list of architects we love.” His firm’s work has been featured in numerous books, magazines, journals and online magazines on architecture, including ArchDaily.com, Dwell, Architectural Record, Architect, and Residential Architect. For more information, go to www.frankharmon.com.

Guest Feature: “The Bridge Across The Rio Grande”

San Augustine Plaza, sketch by Frank Harmon
San Agustin Plaza by Frank Harmon

By Frank Harmon, FAIA

February 2011

(with sketches by Frank Harmon)

 

The bridge across the Rio Grande between Laredo, Texas, and Nuevo Laredo, Mexico, is only a few hundred feet long, but the apparent distance between the two cities is far greater.

 

Like many American cities, Laredo is laid out in broad blocks with wide streets.  Yet over half of its downtown blocks are empty and turned into parking lots because life in Laredo has moved to the fringes. Big block stores, strip malls and residential suburbs have sucked the life out of this American town, just as they have in so many towns from Texas to Maine.  Recently, Laredo’s last bookstore closed.

 

What still makes Laredo special, however, is it position on the border of Mexico, separated from Nuevo Laredo by the Rio Grande.  San Agustin Plaza, near the river, suggests Laredo’s Mexican heritage.  Surrounded by stone and stucco buildings that look as though they were built when Texas belonged to Mexico, San Agustin Plaza is a quiet and sleepy place, with a well-tended lawn dotted with stately palm trees.  Unfortunately, few people were there to enjoy it.

 

A few hundred feet from San Agustin Plaza is the International Bridge, leading to Nuevo Laredo and the Plaza Juarez.  And between the two plazas lies a tale of two cities.

 

I visited both cities a year ago on a bright weekday morning in December.  At lunch at the Posada Inn on the plaza in Laredo, my wife asked our waitress about visiting Nuevo Laredo that afternoon.

 

“Don’t go!” the waitress exclaimed.  “Drugs!  Kidnapping!  It is dangerous place.”

 

Indeed, Laredo is at the apex of drug smuggling through Mexico to the USA, its streets  “…awash in money, stacks of grimy bills tainted in cocaine residue…” according to a recent article in the New York Times.  As the United States has tightened bank regulations to prevent money-laundering, more money from illicit drug sales is being smuggled across the border, wrapped in plastic and stowed in secret compartments built into the trucks, buses and cars that flow over the Mexican border.  And a sluice-way of this river of drugs and money is the International Bridge at Laredo.

 

I’ll admit it sounded a little frightening, this trip to Nuevo Laredo, if I believed the description of Mexico as a center of the drug trade.  But my wife had been to Mexico and Nuevo Laredo many times since she was a child.  Undaunted, she asked our waitress to recommend a guide, and twenty minutes later we were standing at the customs entrance to the International Bridge with Francisco Velasquez, our guide for an afternoon tour of Nuevo Laredo.

 

The bridge was jammed with cars and pedestrians.  At midpoint of the bridge, as though passing through an invisible barrier, we crossed into Mexico.  Most of the pedestrians going to Mexico with us were carrying luggage or pushing carts stuffed with over-sized boxes of Corn Flakes, clothing and video games. We were now fifty feet above the Rio Grande, and the weather was sunny.

 

Plaza Juarez, by Frank Harmon

Customs at the Mexican side of the bridge seemed casual.  Leaving the bridge we came to Plaza Juarez, the twin, you might say, of San Agustin Plaza in Laredo.  In contrast to the stately yet virtually empty plaza in Laredo, though, the plaza in Nuevo Laredo was bustling.  People were coming and going in the shadow of live oak trees while older people sat on benches, children chased around the plaza, and teenagers watched each other.

 

The buildings around the square were durable but rough, made of concrete and stone. The plaza itself was paved in stone, in contrast to the lawn in Laredo. And every storefront around the plaza was occupied by a shop or cantina. We sat for a moment and watched the sunlight filter through the trees as children laughed and played around a fountain.  Francisco told us that the people of Nuevo Laredo were renowned for their friendliness.  During the afternoon he greeted over two dozen people on the street by name.  But he was moving back to Laredo, he said, because his children had bought a house for him there.

 

At one corner of the square we walked into “Marti’s,” a gallery that sold furniture, glass, pottery, jewelry and clothing—all handmade in Mexico, all woven or carved in the region where they were being sold, and all of a quality that told me the people who made them loved what they were doing.

 

The shop itself was an aesthetic experience, approached through a pink stucco courtyard draped with vines where we could hear our footsteps.  Entering we found a quiet, well-lighted interior, like a museum but a friendlier, where every object was affordable.

 

"Marti's" by Frank Harmon

After shopping for an hour we went to the Cadillac Bar down the street and drank freshly made limeades from tall glasses at a polished granite bar underneath a ceiling supported on stone columns.  A group of Mexican businessmen dined at a long table nearby.  No sign of drug barons.  Eventually, we said goodbye to the bar manager and made our way towards the bridge.  Outside a parade was forming.

 

The Felice Navidad parade in Nuevo Laredo is held every year during the week before Christmas.  While we’d been shopping, marching bands from many parts of the region had assembled in Plaza Juarez.  At 4 p.m. they set off down Avenue Guerrero.  The musicians were mostly young, everyone seemed to know each other, their uniforms didn’t always fit well, the music was out of tune, and the marchers were definitely not concerned about being in step. But it didn’t matter because the whole show was magnificent.  Back in North America, we watch our bands in a stadium, we buy our lemonades in a drive-thru, and we shop for clothing in a mall. Here in Mexico we could do all three on a crowded city street.  Here, life is the spectacle.  How simple, I thought, and how incredibly pleasant.

 

There is something to be said for finding pleasure in the everyday, because the most important things in life turn out to be quite simple:  people, relationships, the shadow of oak leaves on the pavement, the laughter of children, the sound of a trumpet in a city.  Simple pleasures that seem hard to find on the other side of the border come easily in Nuevo Laredo.

 

At six in the afternoon most of the traffic going north on the bridge was pedestrian.  The Mexican government had built awnings to shade the sidewalk on the bridge, and I imagined what a difference shade would make on a hot summer day.  We crossed the international border, through a serious U.S. Customs hall, and climbed the hill beneath thousands of blackbirds on the telephone wires above us.  How easily birds can cross the border. How complex it is for humans. I felt totally refreshed to have visited a culture so simple yet so rich.

 

Ironically, many people in Nuevo Laredo would choose to live in Laredo if they could.  And much of what I valued about the simplicity and richness of Nuevo Laredo is actually the result of its relative poverty. Sadly, one of the consequences of poverty is drug trafficking.  Yet what we brought back from Mexico was profoundly legal:  the simple enjoyment of the everyday.

 

Postscript:

 

The pleasure we experienced in Nuevo Laredo a year ago is harder to come by now. In December of this year, the State of Texas warned its residents not to visit Mexico. In Nuevo Laredo, the “Cadillac Bar,” in business for over 50 years, closed along with many other restaurants that served tourists and locals. “Marti’s,” the gallery of Mexican craft and material culture, is moving north to San Antonio.

Frank Harmon Joins “Appetite 4 Architecture” Dinner To Benefit AIA NC

Frank Harmon, FAIA © f8 Photo Studios

All proceeds will go to AIA NC’s Building Fund.

 

January 14, 2011 (RALEIGH, NC) – Frank Harmon, FAIA, principal of Frank Harmon Architect PA and Professor in Practice at the NC State University College of Design, will be one of the three featured guests for Triangle Modernist Houses’ “Appetite 4 Architecture” dinner on Tuesday, February 8th, beginning at 6:30 p.m. at 18 Seaboard restaurant in Raleigh.

 

Proceeds from ticket sales to this dinner will go to the North Carolina Chapter of the American Institute of Architects’ (AIA NC) for its building. The AIA NC Center for Architecture & Design headquarters, designed by Harmon’s firm, is under construction now in downtown Raleigh.

AIA NC Exec. Vice President David Crawford

 

David Crawford, AIA NC’s Executive Vice President, and Steve Schuster, AIA, principal of Clearscapes, will join Harmon for the February 8th A4A dinner. Steve Schuster helped lead the effort to secure financing for the new building. The official groundbreaking ceremony took place on December 9th.

 

Sponsored and hosted by Triangle Modernist houses (TMH), Appetite 4 Architecture dinner events are opportunities for the general public to have informal discussions with Triangle area architects in an upscale dining environment. While TMH founder and director George Smart stresses that there will be no presentations during the Harmon/Crawford/Schuster dinner, “No doubt the new, modern, thoroughly ‘green’ headquarters building will come up!”

Steven Schuster, AIA

 

Tickets for the February 8th dinner at 18 Seaboard are $49 per person and include three courses (appetizer, entree, dessert) from a pre-selected menu plus coffee/water/tea, tax, and gratuity. Vegetarian options are also available. Ticket reservations are available at www.trianglemodernisthouses.com/a4a.htm.

 

For more information on Frank Harmon, FAIA, visit www.frankharmon.com.

For more information on TMH’s series of Appetite 4 Architecture dinners, visit www.trianglemodernisthouses.com.

 

About Frank Harmon, FAIA:

Frank Harmon, FAIA, is founder and principal of Frank Harmon Architect PA, a multi-award-winning firm in Raleigh that is recognized nationally as a leader in innovative, modern, and regionally appropriate “green” architecture. Professor in Practice at NC State University’s College of Design, Harmon is a sought-after speaker at AIA and other conferences and events, and was the only North Carolina architect included in Residential Architect magazine’s recent “RA 50: The Short List of Architects We Love.” The year Harmon’s firm was ranked 13th out of the top 50 firms in the nation by Architect magazine, an annual rating that emphasizes ecological commitment and design quality as much as profitability. His work has been featured in numerous books, magazines and journals on architecture, including Dwell, Architectural Record, Arch Daily, and Residential Architect. For more information visit www.frankharmon.com.

Frank Harmon Makes National “Short List of Architects We Love”

Residential Architect releases its first-ever “RA 50”

Frank Harmon, FAIA © f8 Photo Studios

December 30, 2010 (RALEIGH, NC) –  For the first time in its history, Residential Architect magazine has published its “RA 50: A Short List of Architects We Love.” And Frank Harmon Architect PA of Raleigh, NC, is among them.

According to editor Claire Conroy, “This collection comprises [firms] whose names keep rising to the top.” Along with Harmon’s firm, the list includes such illustrious names as Glenn Murcutt, Brooks-Scarpa Architects, Lake/Flato, and Michelle Kaufman.

Senior editors Nigel Maynard, Cheryl Weber, Meghan Drueding, and Bruce Snider say the RA 50 represents “a broad collection of people who simply – day in and day out – do very good, interesting work.”

Frank Harmon Architect PA is no stranger to Residential Architect’s pages. In 2003, the Taylor Vacation House the firm designed for a couple in the Bahamas was named RA’s House of the Year. In 2005, the firm received the magazine’s Top Firm of the Year accolade.

Since then, founder and principal Frank Harmon, FAIA, has been featured in a number of the magazine’s articles on sustainable, regionally appropriate residential design and construction, and he has been a speaker at RA’s annual “Reinvention” design symposium.

The RA 50 list first appeared in the magazine’s November-December digital version at http://mydigimag.rrd.com/publication/?i=55205 then in print. Harmon’s firm appears on page 30 beside Australian architect Glenn Murcutt, Hon. FAIA. Expanded versions of each architect’s profile will soon be featured on the website www.residentialarchitect.com.

“One of the most exciting things about this is that my firm is featured on the same page as Glenn Murcutt, the most important contemporary architect working today, and a designer from whom I have learned so much,” said Harmon. “I’m also honored simply to be included in the pages of Residential Architect. RA is truly the finest publication on residential design and construction in the nation.”

Residential Architect is an award-winning national magazine focusing exclusively on the residential architecture profession.

“We put this short list together as an end-of-year tribute to this admirable profession,” the editors state.

For more information, visit www.residentialarchitect.com.

For more information on Frank Harmon Architect PA, visit www.frankharmon.com.

About Frank Harmon Architect PA:

Frank Harmon Architect PA, a multi-award-winning firm headquartered in downtown Raleigh, is recognized nationally as a leader in innovative, modern, and regionally inspired “green” architecture. The year the firm was ranked 13th out of the top 50 firms in the nation by Architect magazine, an annual rating that emphasizes ecological commitment and design quality as much as profitability. Recent projects include Duke University’s Ocean Science Teaching Center in Beaufort, the NC Botanical Garden’s new Visitors Center at UNC-Chapel Hill, and Merchants Millpond Outdoor Educational building in Gatesville, N.C. The firm’s work has been featured in numerous books, magazines and journals on architecture, including Dwell, Architectural Record, Arch Daily, and Residential Architect. For more information, go to www.frankharmon.com.

Frank Harmon Architect PA Completes New Lath House for JC Raulston Arboretum

 

The new structure will help young plants transition to the gardens.  

 

October 27, 2010 (RALEIGH, NC) – Frank Harmon Architect PA, an award-winning firm located in Raleigh, NC, well-known for designing projects that showcase and celebrate plant life, has completed the design and construction of the new Lath House at the JC Raulston Arboretum at NC State University in Raleigh.

 

The ten and one half-acre JC Raulston Arboretum is a nationally acclaimed garden with one of the largest and most diverse collections of plants, shrubs and trees adapted for use in Southeastern landscapes from over 50 different countries. Plants are collected and evaluated in an effort to find superior plants for use in southern gardens. Every October since the early 1990s, the JC Raulston Arboretum gives away literally thousands of rare and choice plants it has cultivated during its Friends of the Arboretum Plant Distribution event.

 

The Lath House is a key element within the Arboretum’s work. An open-air laboratory for horticultural research, the original structure sheltered approximately 700 young and tender plants that perform best in shade as they transition towards planting in larger gardens.  The new lath house may provide space for 1000 new plantings.

 

When the Arboretum’s previous lath house needed to be replaced, Frank Harmon, FAIA, volunteered his firm to design a new structure pro bono that would fulfill the specific light-to-shade ratio needed for the plants, using a screen of wood two-by-twos. According to Harmon, the new structure was designed an abstract of a tree that spreads its branches to protect the plants.

 

“Over the last three decades, the JC Raulston lath house nurtured some of the most successful plants for use in Southern gardens, including hosta, ferns, hydrangea and rhododendron,” Harmon said. “We were honored to be a part of the Arboretum’s mission by designing the new Lath House.”

 

Other projects the firm has designed that involve support and protection of plant life include the North Carolina Botanical Gardens Visitors Education Center at UNC-Chapel Hill and the Prairie Ridge Outdoor Classroom and Garden Pavilion at the NC Museum of Natural Science’s Prairie Ridge Eco-station in Raleigh. The firm is currently designing Prairie Ridge’s future Eco-Lodge, a residential dormitory for students, teachers and visiting researchers.

 

The design team for the Lath House included Frank Harmon, FAIA, Erin Sterling, AIA, and Will Lambeth, architectural intern. For more information, visit www.frankharmon.com.

 

Located at 4415 Beryl Road in Raleigh, the JC Raulston Arboretum is largely built and maintained by NC State University students, faculty, volunteers, and staff. It is named for the founder, former director, and Horticultural Science Department teacher the late J.C. Raulston, Ph.D. For more information, visit www.ncsu.edu/jcraulstonarboretum.com.

 

 

About Frank Harmon Architect PA:

Frank Harmon Architect PA, a multi-award-winning firm headquartered in downtown Raleigh, is recognized nationally as a leader in innovative, modern, and regionally inspired “green” architecture. This year the firm was ranked 13th out of the top 50 firms in the nation by Architect magazine, an annual rating that emphasizes ecological commitment and design quality as much as profitability. Recent projects include Duke University’s Ocean Science Teaching Center in Beaufort, the NC Botanical Garden’s new Visitors Center at UNC-Chapel Hill, and Merchants Millpond Outdoor Educational building in Gatesville, N.C. The firm’s work has been featured in numerous books, magazines and journals on architecture, including Dwell, Architectural Record, Architect, and Residential Architect. For more information, go to www.frankharmon.com.