Durham’s BuildSense To Host June’s “Thirst4Architecture”

The BuildSense building in downtown Durham.
The BuildSense building in downtown Durham.

BuildSense, an award-winning design-build firm located in downtown Durham, will host “Thirst4Architecture,” a networking event sponsored by North Carolina Modernist Houses (NCMH) and Emilie Huin of Triangle Modern Homes Real Estate, on Thursday, June 16, from 6-8 p.m., in the firm’s offices at 502 Rigsbee Avenue.

T4A events are opportunities for architects, artists, building managers, contractors, engineers, furniture dealers, realtors, and anyone else interested in Modernist residential design to connect and create strategic alliances in a casual environment. The hosts provide refreshments and other entertainment while introducing T4A participants to their businesses.

Founded by Randall Lanou and Erik Van Mehlman in 1999, BuildSense Inc. is a full-service architecture and construction firm known for designing and building both modern and traditional sustainable, energy efficient homes and renovations. The firm frequently participates in NCMH events, including homes tours and the Matsumoto Prize for Residential Design.

Those attending the June T4A will be able to tour the firm’s ca. 1945 building that served as an auto service center for 30 years before Lanou and Mehlman retrofitted into one of the most energy-efficient buildings in downtown Durham in 2014. For more information on BuildSense, including directions to the offices, visit www.buildsense.com.

For more information on NCMH and the locations for future Thirst4Architecture events, visit www.ncmodernist.org.

redchair smAbout NC Modernist Houses:

North Carolina Modernist Houses (NCMH) is an award-winning, 501C3 nonprofit organizations established in 2007 and dedicated to documenting, preserving, and promoting Modernist residential design. This year, the American Institute of Architects awarded NCMH founder and director George Smart its Collaborative Achievement Award for his work with NCMH. The website www.ncmodernist.org is now the largest open digital archive for Modernist residential design in America. NCMH also hosts popular architecture events every month and frequent home tours, giving the public access to the most exciting residential architecture, past and present. These tours and events raise awareness and help preserve these “livable works of art” for future generations. For more information: www.ncmodernist.org. Find NCMH on FacebookFollow NCMH on Twitter and Instagram.

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Media contact:

Kim Weiss, Blueplate PR

919.272.8615; blueplatepr@gmail.com

Image attached: BuildSense building in downtown Durham, courtesy BuildSense

Pedro Williams: New Barber Shop Opens In Downtown Durham, Designed by The Raleigh Architecture Co.

A neon sign points the way to "Pedro Williams." (photo by Pedro Williams)
A neon sign points the way to “Pedro Williams.” (photo by Pedro Williams)

The Raleigh Architecture Company (RACo) has completed the design and build-out of the third Arrow Haircuts location – only this time in Durham and under the name “Pedro Williams.”

Owners and brothers Pete and Andy Phipps opened their newest location earlier this month in the old Wells Fargo building at 624 Ninth Street, following the success of his first two shops: one in Raleigh’s Cameron Village shopping center, the other on Hargett Street in downtown Raleigh.

Andy Phipps describes the concept for all three locations as “old-style neighborhood barber shops with great customer service” that also happen to serve free beer and display racks of locally made products for sale. He sees them as alternatives to national chains and expensive salons.

Their locations underscore that intent.

“Most hair salons want spaces in shopping centers or strip malls that they can up-fit in two weeks,” architect Robby Johnston, AIA, co-owner of The Raleigh Architecture Company, noted. “Andy and Pete want to be part of the urban fabric, to support local retail, so their shops end up in old buildings and odd spaces that require a lot of work but turn out to be really interesting and unique.”

The Cameron Village shop is located in a space that was occupied by a barbershop from 1966 until Arrow moved in. The Hargett Street location housed Capital City Barber Shop for 80 years starting in 1931.

The 900-square-foot Durham location proved the most challenging of the three, according to RACo co-owner Craig Kerins, AIA. “It was in very poor condition and hadn’t been maintained. The space was sort of a leftover section of the building and hadn’t been treated well over the years.”

Nonetheless, Pedro Williams features all the RACo-designed elements that define the Arrow brand, including the central bar; the use of raw, exposed finishes (plywood, concrete, and galvanized conduit); the stylists’ stations arranged down a long, continuous bar; red metal tool chests for the stylists’ tools; and the red, white, and blue color scheme inspired by vintage barber poles. The aim was friendly, familiar, and hip. Achieved.

So why the name “Pedro Williams” instead of Arrow? Pete Phipps describes it best here: http://guaranteedshorterhair.com.

For more information on The Raleigh Architecture Company, visit www.raleigh-architecture.com.

About The Raleigh Architecture Company:

The Raleigh Architecture Company is an award-winning design/build firm specializing in Modern sustainable architecture, and craftsman-quality construction. As licensed architects and general contractors, we consider designing and building to be one integrated process. This streamlined approach empowers us to meet our clients’ economic expectations and to seamlessly execute high quality details, both small and large. Our office and shop are located under one roof in downtown Raleigh’s Warehouse District at 502 S. West Street. For more information visit www.raleigh-architecture.com, call 919-831-2995, or email: info@raleigh-architecture.com.

NCMH Opens 2015 With Back-To-Back Events In Downtown Durham

A film on Santiago Calatrava’s “Turning Torso” building and a

NCMH
Santiago Calatrava’s “Twisted Tower” residential building in Sweden.

networking event at Kontek.


North Carolina Modernist Houses (NCMH) will open 2015 with two back-to-back Durham events: a special screening of a film about world-renowned architect Santiago Calatrava and a “Thirst4Architecture” (T4A) design networking event at Kontek Systems.

On Wednesday, January 7, at 7:30 pm, the NCMH MODTriangle Architecture Movie Series will present “The Socialist, The Architect, and The Twisted Tower,” the dramatic, behind-the-scenes story about building the tallest residential tower in Malmo, Sweden, that Santiago Calatrava said was inspired by a turning human torso. The environmentally sustainable, 620-foot-high, twisted building once was once named the “world’s best residential building project.”

The film will be shown at Full Frame Theatre, 320 Blackwell Street, on the American Tobacco Campus in Durham. Tickets are $10 per person at the door. Space is limited so early arrival is recommended. Sarah Sonke of ModTriangle, specializing in Modernist real estate sales and auctions, is sponsoring the entire movie series. The Calatrava film’s specific sponsor is Center Studio Architecture, specializing in modern downtown Durham development.

PrintThe following night, Thursday, January 8, Frank Konhaus and Wes Newman of Kontek Systems will host NCMH’s first T4A networking  event in 2015 in their downtown Durham headquarters at 318 Holland Street from 6-8 pm. Free and open to the public, the event will include an exclusive behind-the-scenes tour of one of Kontek’s audio/video design and integration projects in downtown Durham.

T4A events connect hundreds of Modernist design enthusiasts in a casual environment. The host business provides refreshments and other entertainment while attendees build relationships, create strategic alliances, and make new contacts. Emilie Huin of 501 Realty sponsors the 2015 T4A series.

NCMH is an award-winning non-profit organization dedicated to documenting, preserving, and promoting Modernist residential design across the state. For the dates and locations of future movies and T4A events, visit www.ncmodernist.org.

redchair smAbout NC Modernist Houses:

North Carolina Modernist Houses (NCMH) is an award-winning, 501C3 nonprofit organizations established in 2007 and dedicated to documenting, preserving, and promoting Modernist residential design. The website is now the largest open digital archive for Modernist residential design in America. NCMH also hosts popular architecture events every month and frequent home tours, giving the public access to the most exciting residential architecture, past and present. These tours and events raise awareness and help preserve these “livable works of art” for future generations. For more information: www.ncmodernist.org.

 

 

Durham Furniture Designer Hosts December “Thirst4Architecture”

A year-round series of networking events for Modernist design fansE.Leed

Durham-based furniture company Elijah Leed will host North Carolina Modernist Houses “Thirst4Architecture” (T4A) design networking event on Thursday, December 11, from 6-8 p.m. The event is free and open to the public.

 
Emilie Huin of 501 Realty, specializing in Modernist houses in the Triangle, is sponsoring the entire T4A series through December 2015.

Through its T4A events, North Carolina Modernist Houses (NCMH) connects hundreds of Modernist design enthusiasts with each other. The host business provides refreshments and other entertainment while attendees build relationships, create strategic alliances, and make new contacts.

“We welcome Modernist homeowners, architects and designers, artists, builders and contractors, furniture retainers, students, and anyone else with a huge crush on Modernist design,” says NCMH board chair George Smart.

2014t4alogoFounded in 2010, Elijah Leed is a small company that designs and builds furniture and other everyday objects that are “unassuming, love to be used, and are freshly designed from honest materials, ” the company’s website states. “In many ways, our materials are what define us. We are passionate about age-old manufacturing and transparency of where our materials have come from.”

Designer Elijah Leed grew up in the mountains of West Virginia, where he gets most of his lumber. He graduated from Centre College in Danville, Kentucky, with a degree in Studio Art. Today, he designs and builds his furniture and other objects from his studio in downtown Durham’s Golden Belt Arts District at 812 North Mangum Street (27701). For more information visit elijahleed.com.

For the dates and locations of future T4A events, go to www.ncmodernist.org/t4a.

 
redchair smAbout NC Modernist Houses:

North Carolina Modernist Houses (NCMH) is an award-winning, 501C3 nonprofit organizations established in 2007 and dedicated to documenting, preserving, and promoting Modernist residential design. The website is now the largest open digital archive for Modernist residential design in America. NCMH also hosts popular architecture events every month and frequent home tours, giving the public access to the most exciting residential architecture, past and present. These tours and events raise awareness and help preserve these “livable works of art” for future generations. For more information: www.ncmodernist.org.