Works In Progress: Chapel Hill Architect Arielle Schechter, AIA, Announces Three New Residential Projects

PrivacyForTwo

RENDERING: PRIVACY FOR TWO

December 11, 2017 (Chapel Hill, NC) — Arielle Condoret Schechter, AIA, Architect, a full-service architecture firm based in Chapel Hill, NC, has announced three new residential projects, each with remarkably different aspirations.

Big House for a Big Family: Arielle Schechter, principal and founder, describes one of her newest clients as a “big, loving, blended family with kids and more kids on the way.” The family needs a generously sized modern house “for the rest of their lives,” she said, with plenty of space for the family as it is today and as it will be in the future as it expands with spouses and grandchildren.

One response will be a huge playroom to allow for ping pong, pool, and foosball “at any hour of the day or night.” The playroom will connect directly to the house and to the outdoors, allowing access to a future swimming pool. “This house is all about togetherness and family fun,” Schechter noted.

Privacy for Two: A husband and wife anxious to escape what they call a “soul-deadening” cookie-cutter residential development, have hired Schechter to plan and design a very private new home that will let them “just disappear into the woods,” she said. The “woods” she refers to are in Chatham County.

According to the architect, they are a modest couple and want a modern but simple, unpretentious, age-in-place design that let them live out their lives together in peace, away from the restrictions of a housing development.

One of Schechter’s inspirations was her clients’ request for “a sheltered place to sit outside and watch the rain.” In response, she has designed a deeply cantilevered roof where they can sit outside and enjoy the rain without getting wet.

A Doctor in the House: Schechter’s third new project is a modern residence for a doctor who teaches and practices at Duke University, his wife, and their son. The family moved to Durham from New York City. Their primary objective is a family home for three that maintains the parents’ connection to their young son.

One design decision directly related to that concept: a second-floor bridge that “floats” over an open, double-height living room. The bridge connects the master suite to their son’s suite, both of which are on the second floor. The lower level will feature the public spaces – living, dining, kitchen areas — and guest rooms that can double as an office or den.

For more information on Arielle Schechter and to see her built work as well as other “On The Boards” projects, visit www.acsarchitect.com.

About Arielle Condoret Schechter, AIA:

Arielle Condoret Schechter, AIA, is a licensed, registered architect based in Chapel Hill, NC, who specializes in Modernist, energy-efficient buildings with a focus on passive houses, NET ZERO houses, and her new tiny house plans, the Micropolis Houses™. She is a lifelong environmentalist and began practicing green design long before it became mainstream. She is also a lifelong animal advocate who lives in Chapel Hill with her husband, Arnie, and an assortment of foster animals in the Modern, sustainable house she designed for them. For more information: www.acsarchitect.com.

 

 

 

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Making History: Katherine Hogan, Vincent Petrarca Receive Kamphoefner Prize for Modern Architecture

 

The first husband-wife partnership 

VandK Portrait


Katherine Hogan, AIA, and Vincent Petrarca, partners in life and in the award-winning Raleigh firm Tonic Design, were honored to receive the 2017 Kamphoefner Prize at the AIA North Carolina Design Conference held in Wilmington September 13-15.

Named for the founding dean of NC State University’s School (now College) of Design, Henry Kamphoefner (1907-1990), the $10,000 Prize is one of the highest honors for practicing architects in the state.

This marks the first time the Prize has been awarded to a husband-wife partnership.

“Everything we design, we design together,” Petrarca stressed. “So the only possible way we could receive this incredible honor or any other award is together.”

“It is an honor to be recognized among those who are dedicated to forwarding the modern tradition in our place,” Hogan added. “We have many mentors on this list of past recipients, who we have followed and been inspired by over the years. We are honored to be recognized as part of this group.”

Among past Kamphoefner Prize recipients are AIA Fellows Arthur Cogswell, Frank Harmon, Jeffrey Lee, Kenneth Hobgood, Ellen Weinstein, Phil Szostak, and Roger Cannon.

Tonic Design
Vinny and Katherine accept the 2017 Prize during the AIA NC Conference in Wilmington, NC

The Path Leading to The Prize

Over the past decade, Hogan and Petrarca have amassed an array of awards and honors:

  • They’ve already received 41 design awards, including 27 awards sanctioned by the American Institute of Architects (AIA).
  • Their work has been published over 40 times in magazines, professional journals, architectural websites, and blogs.
  • They’ve lectured at architecture schools and design conferences since 2007, including the AIA National Convention.
  • They’re served their profession in various capacities through AIANC, AIA Triangle, and both NC State and Syracuse universities. They’ve also served on numerous professional awards juries.
  • Since 2011, they have been adjunct professors at North Carolina State University’s College of Design and Visiting Critics at Syracuse University. They’ve also served as guest jurors for architectural studios at five different universities, including the University of Illinois in Chicago.
  • In 2013, they were named Residential Architect magazine’s “Rising Stars” out of all young firms in the nation.
  • In 2014, Hogan received Triangle Business Journal’sWomen In Business “Future Star” award.

Kamphoefner Prize winners must be currently practicing in North Carolina and must have consistently contributed to the development of modern architecture for at least 10 years “without yielding to any of the undesirable current clichés, neo-modernistic mannerisms or artless historicism that have flawed the building culture of today,” as Dean Kamphoefner wrote when he and his wife, Mable, established the Prize in the 1980s.

Attesting to the Tonic duo’s consistent contributions, Will Bruder, FAIA, of Will Bruder Architects, Phoenix, AZ, wrote in his Letter of Support, “Their design solutions have become both distinctively original and memorably relevant. Their work exemplifies not only the best traditions of modernism but also an abiding respect for the clients and communities they serve,” he wrote.

“Katherine and Vinny both honor the architectural tradition that Dean Kamphoefner envisioned,” Michael Speaks, Ph.D., Dean and Professor, Syracuse University School of Architecture, noted in his letter.

And J. Patrick Rand, FAIA, a Distinguished Professor of Architecture at the NCSU College of Design, asserted his belief that their work “transcends necessity and moves toward poetry, but does so with a language that is the fusion of conceptual ideals and practical circumstances. [Their] buildings show that proportion, materiality, space and experience are the essential contents of architecture.”

For more information on Tonic Design: www.tonic-design.com.

For more information on The Kamphoefner Prize, visit www.aiancawards.org.

 

2016 Matsumoto Prize Now Accepting Submissions

The 2015 Jurors' Award, First Prize, winner: The Aiyyer Residence by CUBE Design
The 2015 Jurors’ Award, First Prize, winner: The Aiyyer Residence by CUBE Design

A unique architecture competition celebrating Modernist residential design across North Carolina.

Submissions will be accepted in the 2016 George Matsumoto Prize, Recognizing Excellence in North Carolina Modernist Residential Design starting at 8 a.m., May 1, sponsored by the award-winning non-profit organization North Carolina Modernist Houses. The deadline for submissions is 5 p.m., May 23rd.

Now in its fifth year, the Matsumoto Prize is named for George Matsumoto, FAIA, a founding member of the North Carolina State University School (now College) of Design, who is well known for the many mid-century Modernist houses he designed in North Carolina.

The Matsumoto Prize is a unique design awards program. It is the only juried architecture competition in North Carolina that focuses on Modernist houses, provides financial awards ($6000 total), involves a national jury as well as online public voting, and connects to a major architectural archive.

The competition is open to anyone with primary design responsibility for a completely built, from-the-ground-up, single-family Modernist house of at least 800 heated square feet that was completed on or after January 1, 2011. The designer does not have to be a licensed architect. The houses submitted must be in North Carolina but the designers may be from anywhere.

“The Matsumoto Prize promotes new talent and provides motivating honors and incentives for a new generation of architects,” said NCMH founder and director George Smart. “It also contributes to wider public recognition of Modernism in all its forms — architecture, art, furniture, and fashion — and recognizes the significant economic and aesthetic impact of Modernism across North Carolina.”

In addition to the jury, the public will vote on the submissions with the top winners getting “People’s Choice” recognition. Public voting will take place at www.ncmodernist.org/prize2016 from June 1-29.

Again this year, George Matsumoto will serve as the jury’s Honorary Chair. He will joined by: Ray Kappe, Kappe Architects, Los Angeles; Alison Brooks, Alison Brooks Architects, London; Joshua Prince-Ramus, REX, New York; Harry Wolf, Wolf Architecture, Los Angeles; Charles McMurray, Charles McMurray Designs, Miami; and Oscar-nominated production designer Nathan Crowley, Los Angeles.

The 2016 Matsumoto Prize awards ceremony will be held Thursday, July 1, from 6-8 p.m., at McConnell Studios, 324 Dupont Circle, Raleigh.

Competition rules, submission procedures and guidelines are available at http://www.ncmodernist.org/prize2016. To see last year’s submissions and winners: http://www.ncmodernist.org/prize2015.

About North Carolina Modernist Houses:

North Carolina Modernist Houses (NCMH) is an award-winning 501C3 nonprofit established in 2007 and dedicated to documenting, preserving, and promoting Modernist residential design. The website is now the largest open digital archive for Modernist residential design in America. NCMH also hosts popular architecture events every month, giving the public access to the most exciting residential architecture, past and present. These tours and events raise awareness and help preserve these “livable works of art” for future generations. For more information: www.ncmodernist.org.

The Raleigh Architecture Co. Wins AIA NC Honor Award for “Edentwins”

Photo © Raymond Goodmon, 2014
Photo © Raymond Goodmon, 2014

Two modern, urban-infill houses designed in tandem, side-by-side.

When architects enter custom-designed housing in awards competitions, they enter either single-family houses or multi-dwelling projects: multiple, separate housing units that are contained within one building or several buildings within one complex.

For the 2015 AIA NC Design Awards, The Raleigh Architecture Company (RACo) did neither. Partners Craig Kerins, AIA, and Robby Johnston, AIA, entered “Edentwins” — two single-family urban-infill houses that they designed concurrently and built on adjoining lots in downtown Raleigh.

On September 26, Johnston and Kerins received an Honor Award for their innovative duo from the North Carolina Chapter of the American Institute of Architects (AIA NC) during an awards ceremony held at the 21c Museum Hotel in Durham.

“Edentwins challenge standard single-family infill development by sharing space, resources, and mutual values with each other,” said Johnston, who lives in one of the award-winning houses with his wife and young daughters.

Edentwins are perched above East Edenton Street, a three-lane, one-way thoroughfare that connects residential neighborhoods to the east with downtown Raleigh. The site plan is organized around a shared central courtyard that visually and spatially ties the houses — and the families who occupy them — together. The courtyard provides outdoor play space for the kids and fresh-air entertainment space for the parents.

According to the RACo partners, small buildable areas on the lots and tight zoning restrictions influenced the houses’ compact linear footprints and projecting forms. Front porches, shaded by the cantilevered second floors, link the homes to the community, reinforce the existing vernacular, and maintain how houses there address the sidewalk and street.

Conceived of as “fraternal twins,” according to the partners, the homes share common traits yet retain their own identities. For example, golden-toned North Carolina cypress adds a note of warmth to the exteriors of both flat-roofed houses, although 556 combines the wood with the rusty patina of Corten® steel while 554 uses reclaimed slate from an old house razed in a nearby neighborhood as outdoor cladding.

The award-winning “Edentwins” are the first houses in a cluster of homes the RACo team is completing in the old inner-city neighborhood known as Hungry Neck North.

For more information on RACo and all of the firm’s projects, visit www.raleigh-architecture.com.

About The Raleigh Architecture Company:

The Raleigh Architecture Company is an award-winning design-build firm specializing in Modern sustainable architecture, and craftsman-quality construction. As licensed architects and general contractors, we consider designing and building to be one integrated process. This streamlined approach empowers us to meet our clients’ economic expectations and to seamlessly execute high quality details, both small and large. Our office and shop are located under one roof in downtown Raleigh’s Warehouse District at 502 S. West Street. For more information visit www.raleigh-architecture.com, call 919-831-2995, or email: info@raleigh-architecture.com.

 

 

2015 Matsumoto Prize Honors Six Exemplary Modernist Houses

NC Modernist Houses
Jury Awards First Prize winner: the Aiyyer House by CUBE design + research

North Carolina Modernist Houses announced the six winners – three Jury awards and three People’s Choice awards — for the 2015 George Matsumoto Prize for Modernist residential design during a special event at McConnell Studios in downtown Raleigh.

Houses submitted to the annual competition must be in North Carolina but designers may be based anywhere. A panel of distinguished architects including Jeanne Gang and Peter Gluck chose the Jury Award winners. The 2015 Prize was underwritten by Leland Little Auctions.

NCMH Founder and Director George Smart announced this year’s results.

The 2015 Jury winners are:

First Prize ($3000) — CUBE design + research, Chapel Hill, for the Aiyyer Residence in Carrboro, NC.  Photo at left by Richard Leo Johnson

Second Prize ($2000) – Tonic Design + Tonic Construction, Raleigh, for “Crabill Modern” in Hillsborough, NC.  Photo courtesy Tonic Desig

Third Prize ($1000) – in situ studio, Raleigh, for “Clark Court” in Raleigh. Photo by Richard Leo Johnson

Online public voting determined the three People’s Choice winners. With nearly 2000 votes cast, the 2015 People’ Choice winners are:

First Place: Kersting Architecture, Wilmington, NC, for “Waterline” beach house in Wrightsville Beach, NC. Photo by Rick Ricozzi

Second Place: Roost Homes, Asheville, for Peregrine #5 in Lakeview Park in Asheville, NC. Photo by Olivia Marone

Third Place: Ann Clark Architects, Chicago, for the Knight Howard House in Deep Run, NC. Photo by Stacey Van Berkel

The Matsumoto Prize honors George Matsumoto, FAIA, a founding faculty member at the North Carolina State University School of Design (now College of Design) who is well known for the exemplary mid-century Modernist houses he designed across the state. Matsumoto also served as Honorary Chair of the professional jury.

Sponsors of the award night included Palette and ParlorMitchell Restoration, and Paolo Tomasi Sales.

For more information on the Matsumoto Prize, the jury, and this year’s award winners as well as all the submissions, visit http://www.ncmodernist.org/prize2015.

North Carolina Modernist Houses

About North Carolina Modernist Houses: 

North Carolina Modernist Houses (NCMH) is an award-winning, 501C3 nonprofit organization established in 2007 and dedicated to documenting, preserving, and promoting Modernist residential design. The website is now the largest open digital archive for Modernist residential design in America. NCMH also hosts popular architecture events every month and frequent home tours, giving the public access to the most exciting residential architecture, past and present. These tours and events raise awareness and help preserve these “livable works of art” for future generations. For more information: www.ncmodernist.org.

McConnell Studios To Host Matsumoto Prize Presentation, Thirst4Architecture

North Carolina Modernist Houses

McConnell Studios in Boylan Heights, Raleigh, will host North Carolina Modernist Houses’ 2015 George Matsumoto Prize awards for Modernist residential design on Thursday, July 23, from 6-8 p.m. Free and open to the public, the awards presentation will be part of a “Thirst4Architecture” design networking event.

Along with the awards presentation, entertainment for the evening will include free music, food, beer, coffee, and a chance to tour through

North Carolina Modernist Houses
Steel and glass “Dragon” by McConnell Studios for the NC State Bar Association

McConnell Studio’s sculpture, lighting, architectural elements, and other custom-fabricated products. A game of “Modernist Musical Chairs,” sponsored by Ivy Simon of Palette & Parlor in Chapel Hill, will give guests a chance to win a Modernist chair. Leland Little Auctions, this year’s Prize sponsor, will also auction off a chair and ottoman by Mitchell Restoration.

Now in its third year, The Matsumoto Prize is the only professionally juried competition with cash prizes specifically for Modernist houses. Over 1700 public votes have been cast for the three top People’s Choice awards, which will also be presented that night. (To see the houses, go to http://www.ncmodernist.org/prize2015.htm.)

“These entries inspire people to dream of having their own Modernist house,” said NCMH founder and director George Smart. “Most people are surprised to know Modernist design doesn’t have to be expensive.  It can easily be affordable, efficient, sustainable, and a house their families will love for decades. This year’s entries are terrific, and we’re looking forward to revealing this winners.”

NCMH’s monthly Thirst4Architecture networking events are sponsored by Emilie Huin/Triangle Modern Homes, specializing in the sale of Modernist homes throughout the Triangle.

McConnell Studios is located at 324 Dupont Circle, Raleigh. For more information and directions, go to http://www.mattmcconnell.com.

redchair smAbout North Carolina Modernist Houses: 

North Carolina Modernist Houses (NCMH) is an award-winning, 501C3 nonprofit organization established in 2007 and dedicated to documenting, preserving, and promoting Modernist residential design. The website is now the largest open digital archive for Modernist residential design in America. NCMH also hosts popular architecture events every month and frequent home tours, giving the public access to the most exciting residential architecture, past and present. These tours and events raise awareness and help preserve these “livable works of art” for future generations. For more information: www.ncmodernist.org.

Modernist Homes Tour in Charlotte, Plus Shopping at IKEA

NCMH’s ModShop Tour is May 9th

The 1964 Mitchum residence is one of the mid-century Modernist houses on the tour.
The 1964 Mitchum residence is one of the mid-century Modernist houses on the tour.

North Carolina Modernist Houses (NCMH), the award winning non-profit dedicated to documenting, preserving, and promoting Modernist residential design, will be going on its semi-annual ModShop Tour on Saturday, May 9, from 7 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. This popular bus tour includes shopping at IKEA as well as visiting several Modernist houses and a church as part of Historic Charlotte’s Mad About Modern Tour.
Aboard a spacious, wi-fi-equipped bus, tour participants will be taken to five houses and one Modernist church:

  1. The 1964 Hugh C. Mitchum Residence, designed by the late Charlotte engineer Aubrey Arant (pictured above)
  2. 4642 Sharon View(architect unknown)
  3. 2434 Ainsdale(architect unknown)
  4. The Levinson House, 2827 Rothwood Drive, designed by Charlotte architect Stan Russell
  5. The McFarland House, 714 Larkhall Lane (architect unknown)
  6. The1957 Sharon United Methodist Church, which will be demolished within the next 12 months (architect unknown).

Mid Center Salvage, a Charlotte company that restores Mid-Century and Danish Modern Furniture from the 1950s to the 1970s, is sponsoring the tour. The bus will stop there mid-day for a tour and a catered lunch.

After touring more houses, the group will go to IKEA for two hours of imgresshopping before departing for Raleigh.

Tickets are $119 per person and $99 for current members of NCMH’s Mod Squad. The price includes transportation, all admissions, breakfast, lunch, and snacks. For more details and to purchase tickets, go to http://www.ncmodernist.org/modshop.htm. Seating is limited so those interested should secure tickets very soon.

Charlotte residents may purchase tickets to the Mad About Modern Tour atwww.historiccharlotte.org.

redchair smAbout NC Modernist Houses:

North Carolina Modernist Houses (NCMH) is an award-winning, 501C3 nonprofit organizations established in 2007 and dedicated to documenting, preserving, and promoting Modernist residential design. The website is now the largest open digital archive for Modernist residential design in America. NCMH also hosts popular architecture events every month and frequent home tours, giving the public access to the most exciting residential architecture, past and present. These tours and events raise awareness and help preserve these “livable works of art” for future generations.

NCMH Announces 2015 Matsumoto Prize for Modernist Residential Design

ncmhlogo-1

Sponsored exclusively this year by Leland Little Auctions.

North Carolina Modernist Houses (NCMH) announces that the naming sponsor for the 2015 George Matsumoto Prize for North Carolina Modernist residential design is Leland Little Auctions, the Southeast’s premier estate auction gallery, based in Hillsborough, NC.

NCMH created the Matsumoto Prize in 2012 to honor George Matsumoto, FAIA, one of the founding faculty members of North Carolina State University’s School of Design (now College of Design). Matsumoto designed some of North Carolina’s most well-known and well-loved mid-century Modernist houses.

The Matsumoto Prize uniquely features $6000 in awards, a blue-ribbon jury of internationally known architects, and online public voting.

According to George Smart, NCMH Executive Director, “The Matsumoto Prize promotes new talent and provides motivating honors and incentives for a new generation of architects. It also contributes to wider public recognition of Modernism in all its forms — architecture, art, furniture, and fashion — and recognizes the significant economic and aesthetic impact of Modernism across North Carolina.”  LLittle Logo

Leland Little explained why his estate auction gallery stepped up as the exclusive sponsor of the 2015 Matsumoto Prize:

“We have admired the way that NCMH and George Smart have highlighted and recognized North Carolina’s wonderful cache of Modernist homes, generating appreciation of and interest in this aesthetic style. We are very proud to sponsor the 2015 Matsumoto Prize.”

The Matsumoto Prize is open to anyone with primary design responsibility for a completely built, from-the-ground-up, single-family Modernist house of at least 800 heated square feet completed on or after January 1, 2009. The house must be in North Carolina but the designer(s) can be from anywhere. There are no educational or licensure requirements for submission; the design speaks for itself.

NCMH will accept submissions May 1 until May 17. All submissions will be posted on the NCMH website for public voting to determine the People’s Choice winners.   Jury Awards are $3,000 first place, $2,000 second place, $1,000 third place, plus a trophy for each.  Winners will be announced July 16 during an awards ceremony at McConnell Studios in Raleigh.

For more information on the 2015 George Matsumoto Prize, go to http://www.ncmodernist.org/prize2015.

redchair smAbout North Carolina Modernist Houses:  

North Carolina Modernist Houses (NCMH) is an award-winning, 501C3 nonprofit organization established in 2007 and dedicated to documenting, preserving, and promoting Modernist residential design. The website is the largest open digital archive for Modernist residential design in America. NCMH also hosts popular architecture events monthly and offers frequent home tours, giving the public access to the most exciting Modernist houses, past and present. Tours and events raise awareness and help preserve these “livable works of art” for future generations. For more information: www.ncmodernist.org or george@ncmodernist.org.

North Carolina Modernist Houses Announces the 2015 Matsumoto Prize Jury

Nationally known architects to judge annual Modernist house competitionncmhlogo-1

North Carolina Modernist Houses (NCMH), the award-winning non-profit organization dedicated to documenting, preserving, and promoting Modernist residential design across the state, has announced the 2015 George Matsumoto Prize Jury.

The 2015 jury includes MacArthur Fellow Jeanne Gang, FAIA, Studio Gang Architects, Chicago; Harry Bates, Bates Masi Architects, Sag Harbor, New York; Eric Gartner, AIA, SG Architects, New York; Peter Gluck, Gluck+, New York; Bev Thorne, the last living architect to have participated in Arts & Architecture‘s famous Case Study Houses, Oakland; and Honorary Chair George Matsumoto, FAIA.

Now in its fourth year, the Matsumoto Prize honors George Matsumoto, a founding faculty member of North Carolina State University’s School of Design (now College of Design) and architect of some of the state’s best-known and historically significant Modernist houses.

The Matsumoto Prize is a unique awards program. It is the only juried architecture competition in North Carolina that focuses solely on Modernist houses, provides financial awards, involves a national jury of Modernist architects, offers the opportunity for public voting, and connects to a major architectural archive.  Residential architects and designers entering the competition can be from anywhere but their houses must be in North Carolina.

“The Prize powerfully engages the greater community to be involved with the architecture they love,” said NCMH Executive Director George Smart. “The competition publicly showcases a new generation of outstanding Modernist architects and houses, promoting new talent and providing motivating honors and incentives in our state.”

The call for submissions will be announced in 2015. For more information on the 2015 Matsumoto Prize, visit http://www.ncmodernist.org/prize2015. To see past winners, go to http://www.ncmodernist.org/matsumotoprize.htm.

redchairAbout North Carolina Modernist Houses:

North Carolina Modernist Houses (NCMH) is an award-winning 501C3 nonprofit established in 2007 and dedicated to documenting, preserving, and promoting Modernist residential design. The website is the largest open digital archive for Modernist residential design in America. NCMH also hosts popular architecture events every month, giving the public access to the most exciting residential architecture, past and present. Its many homes tours and events raise awareness and help preserve these “livable works of art” for future generations. For more information: www.ncmodernist.org.

 

 

 

 

Uber-Green House in Chatham County Is Finalist For USGBC Award

Happy Meadows Courtyard House Rendering

Recognizing systematic integration of sustainability and LEED standards.

The Happy Meadows Courtyard House, a thoroughly sustainable Modern residence designed by Chapel Hill architect Arielle Condoret Schechter, AIA is a finalist for the 2014 Green Gala Sustainable Business Awards in the Residential category. The US Green Building Council / North Carolina chapter selects and presents the annual awards.

The Sustainable Business Awards recognize the best designed or built projects that demonstrate the systematic integration of sustainability and LEED standards.

Built by Chapel Hill Contractor Kevin Murphy of NewPhire Building for Phil and Velma Helfaer, the 2567-square-foot Chatham County residence is located on a five-acre property and built at the highest point of the site, leaving the existing large meadow and remainder of the site, including mature trees, undisturbed. Architect Schechter, an animal advocate, included a wildlife pond as part of the design concept.

All main rooms in the house face south for passive solar gain and deep roof overhangs shade the interior all summer yet lets the sun penetrate all the way inside in the winter. The house maintains an intimate relationship with the outdoors via a large south-facing terrace, a small interior courtyard, and glass exterior doors in all main rooms.

Other sustainable features are: operable windows for cross ventilation and to take advantage of the prevailing breezes; abundant daylight so that electric lights (all LED) should not be needed by day; thick 5500 psi prefabricated concrete exterior walls that incorporate reclaimed fly-ash and help the interior stay cool in the summer; no-VOC finishes and Air Renew Essential sheetrock that converts any VOC within it into an inert compound; 100% rainwater capture from the white EPDM “cool roof” that allows for the cleanest rainwater capture; 5.4KW photovoltaic array, which will produce 98% of the house’s energy; a Conditioning Energy Recovery Ventilator that pre-dehumidifies incoming fresh air in summer; and the use of scrap materials for many interior finishes.

Still under construction, Happy Meadows has already been certified to PHIUS PLUS (Passive House Institute US) standards, one of the strictest building sustainability standards in the world. It has also achieved NET-Zero, meaning that the house produces all of the energy it used. Happy Meadows is projected to be LEED Platinum.

“Could this house be any greener?” asked Schechter. “Maybe, but I don’t know how!”

The 2014 winners will be announced during the Green Gala, which will be held at the LEED Gold Ritz-Carlton hotel in Uptown Charlotte on Friday, September 26.

For more information on all categories in the 2014 the Sustainable Business Awards, go to http://www.usgbcnc.org/?page=PacketRequest.

For more information on Arielle Schechter and “Happy Meadows Courtyard,” visit www.acsarchitect.com

About Arielle Condoret Schechter, AIA:

Arielle Condoret Schechter, AIA, is a licensed, registered architect based in Chapel Hill, NC, who specializes in Modernist, energy-efficient buildings of all types and sizes, especially houses. She admits that she is “obsessed with light,” which drives her designs more than any other single element. Her firm also offers landscape design, interior and lighting design, and custom furniture and fixtures. She attended the North Carolina School of the Arts, the Julliard School of Music, and NC State University’s College of Design. She lives with her husband, Arnie Schechter, and an assortment of foster animals in a Modern, energy-efficient house she designed. For more information: www.acsarchitect.com.